Joining The Daily Mile movement to help kids focus on learning

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It’s been long understood that exerting energy is important for children to “get their wiggles out.” Science backs this up, showing that exercise benefits memory and thinking skills for children, especially those with ADHD, and it is also good for adults.

The good news is that giving students a chance to exercise effectively can be accomplished in just 15 minutes without any planning. It’s a simple as having them jog or run outside a mile a day. This is The Daily Mile movement, and it’s proving highly effective at improving children’s fitness as well as their behavior in school. Research has shown that The Daily Mile can even increase attainment in primary school, and parents have reported an increased interest in health and well being from their children after they have started The Daily Mile.

Started in the United Kingdom, The Daily Mile is now in more than 3600 schools around the world. As explained on its website, The Daily Mile works because it is simple and free.

  • It takes place over just 15 minutes, with children averaging a mile each day.
  • Children run outside in the fresh air — and the weather is a benefit, not a barrier.
  • There’s no set up, tidy up, or equipment needed.
  • No training is needed for teachers.
  • Children run in their uniforms so no kit or changing time is needed.
  • It’s social, non-competitive and fun.
  • The children return to class ready to learn.
  • It helps to improve fitness and health weight.
  • It encourages children to be aware of their health.
  • It’s fully inclusive; every child, whatever their circumstances, age or ability, succeeds at The Daily Mile.

If you’re a teacher, it’s easy to add your school to the list. Just go to https://thedailymile.co.uk/ and click on School Sign-up. You can also find advice and resources to promote and implement The Daily Mile, although it is pretty uncomplicated. The main advice is to keep it simple, and also to encourage children to jog or run instead of walk, although children should be allowed to walk if they get tired.

Happy running!

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